FBI Hate Crime Statistics, 2019

Today the FBI released Hate Crime Statistics, 2019, the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program’s latest compilation about bias-motivated incidents throughout the nation. The 2019 data, submitted by 15,588 law enforcement agencies, provide information about the offenses, victims, offenders, and locations of hate crimes.

Law enforcement agencies submitted incident reports involving 7,314 criminal incidents and 8,559 related offenses as being motivated by bias toward race, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender, and gender identity. Please note the UCR Program does not estimate offenses for the jurisdictions of agencies that do not submit reports. Highlights of Hate Crime Statistics, 2019 follow. (Due to rounding, percentage breakdowns may not add to 100%.)

The number of antisemitic hate crimes in the United States increased significantly in 2019, in a year that saw three lethal attacks against Jews.

Anti-Semitic incidents again comprised the majority of hate crimes based on religion. In addition, the number of hate crime murders overall more than doubled nationwide last year.
    Victims of Hate Crime Incidents
    • There were 7,103 single-bias incidents involving 8,552 victims. A percent distribution of victims by bias type shows that 57.6% of victims were targeted because of the offenders’ race/ethnicity/ancestry bias; 20.1% were targeted because of the offenders’ religious bias; 16.7% were victimized because of the offenders’ sexual-orientation bias; 2.7% were targeted because of the offenders’ gender identity bias; 2.0% were victimized because of the offenders’ disability bias; and 0.9% were victimized because of the offenders’ gender bias.
    • There were 211 multiple-bias hate crime incidents, which involved 260 victims.
    Offenses by Crime Category
    • Of the 5,512 hate crime offenses classified as crimes against persons in 2019, 40% were for intimidation, 36.7% were for simple assault, and 21% were for aggravated assault. Fifty-one (51) murders; 30 rapes; and three offenses of human trafficking (commercial sex acts) were reported as hate crimes. The remaining 41 hate crime offenses were reported in the category of other.
    • There were 2,811 hate crime offenses classified as crimes against property. The majority of these (76.6%) were acts of destruction/damage/vandalism. Robbery, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, and other offenses accounted for the remaining 23.4% of crimes against property.
    • Two hundred thirty-six (236) additional offenses were classified as crimes against society. This crime category represents society’s prohibition against engaging in certain types of activity such as gambling, prostitution, and drug violations. These are typically victimless crimes in which property is not the object.
    Known Offenders

    In the UCR Program, the term known offender does not imply that the suspect’s identity is known; rather, the term indicates that some aspect of the suspect was identified, thus distinguishing the suspect from an unknown offender. Law enforcement agencies specify the number of offenders and, when possible, the race of the offender or offenders as a group. Beginning in 2013, law enforcement began reporting whether suspects were juveniles or adults, as well as the suspect’s ethnicity when possible.
    • Of the 6,406 known offenders, 52.5% were white, and 23.9% were Black or African American. Other races accounted for the remaining known offenders: 1.1% were American Indian or Alaska Native, 0.9% were Asian, 0.3% were Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and 6.6% were of a group of multiple races. The race was unknown for 14.6%.
    • Of the 5,443 known offenders for whom ethnicity was reported, 33.1% were Not Hispanic or Latino, 10% were Hispanic or Latino, and 1.9% were in a group of multiple ethnicities. Ethnicity was unknown for 55.0% of these offenders.
    • Of the 5,599 known offenders for whom ages were known, 84.6% were 18 years of age or older.
    Locations of Hate Crimes

    Law enforcement agencies may specify the location of an offense within a hate crime incident as 1 of 46 location designations. In 2019, most hate crime incidents (24.6%) occurred in or near residences/homes. More than 18% (18.2) occurred on highways/roads/alleys/streets/sidewalks; 9.6% occurred at schools/colleges; 4.7% happened at parking/drop lots/garages; and 4.4% took place in churches/synagogues/temples/mosques. The location was reported as other/unknown for 11.2% of hate crime incidents. The remaining 27.3% of hate crime incidents took place at other or multiple locations.

    Note: This edition of Hate Crime Statistics and the upcoming edition of NIBRS (which is scheduled for release later this year) are the final UCR crime data publications to be released in the traditional format on fbi.gov. Beginning January 1, 2021, UCR data will be published exclusively to the FBI’s Crime Data Explorer. The traditional publications for 2019 and previous years will remain on fbi.gov for the foreseeable future.

    The full Hate Crime Statistics, 2019 report is available at https://ucr.fbi.gov/hate-crime/2019.

    Download Files 

    On most pages in Hate Crime Statistics, 2019, a link to “download printable document” is provided. In addition to downloading individual documents this way, site visitors may opt to obtain all the publication’s tables and narrative portions as follows: 

    Data Tables 

    This file includes Microsoft Excel files for the Participation Table and Tables 1 through 14. It was compressed with WinZip software. 


    Narrative Portions 

    This file contains the Adobe Portable Document Format (i.e., PDF) files of the narrative portions of the topic pages, resource pages, and data declarations. It was compressed with WinZip software. 


    Source: FBI